Akkrostiku

Poeżija, kitba poetika, stil sunett

English: Acrostic: – An acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out a word or a message.

There is a classic example of acrostic poem in English written by Edgar Allan Poe, entitled simply “An Acrostic”:

Elizabeth it is in vain you say
Love not”—thou sayest it in so sweet a way:
In vain those words from thee or L.E.L.
Zantippe’s talents had enforced so well:
Ah! if that language from thy heart arise,
Breath it less gently forth—and veil thine eyes.
Endymion, recollect, when Luna tried
To cure his love—was cured of all beside—
His follie—pride—and passion—for he died.

 

 

Akrostika

Acrostic; a poem (or other form of writing) in which the first letter (or syllable, or word) of each line (or paragraph, or other recurring feature in the text) spells out a word, message or the alphabet.

Source: Italian

Plural: Akrostiki

 

Alliterazzjoni

English: Alliteration; the commencement of two or more words of a word group with the same letter, as in apt alliteration’s artful aid.

 

 

 

Anfibraku

Amphibrach: A metrical foot used in Latin and Greek prosody. It consists of a long syllable between two short syllables. The word comes from the Greek ἀμφίβραχυς, amphíbrakhys, “short on both sides”.

 

Aposjopesi

Aposiopesis: (Classical Greek: ἀποσιώπησις, “becoming silent”) is a figure of speech wherein a sentence is deliberately broken off and left unfinished, the ending to be supplied by the imagination, giving an impression of unwillingness or inability to continue.

Source: Italian

Plural: Aposjopesijiet