Kalomel

Calomel is a mercury chloride mineral with formula Hg2Cl2 (see mercury(I) chloride). The name derives from Greek kalos (beautiful) and melos (black) because it turns black on reaction with ammonia.

Kawlina

Kaolin, Kaolinite; China clay.

Kaolinite is a clay mineral, Rocks that are rich in kaolinite are known as kaolin /ˈkəlɪn/ or china clay. The name “kaolin” is derived from “Gaoling” (Chinese: 高嶺; pinyin: Gāolǐng; literally: ‘High Ridge’), a Chinese village near Jingdezhen in southeastern China’s Jiangxi Province.The name entered English in 1727 from the French version of the word: kaolin, following François Xavier d’Entrecolles’s reports on the making of Jingdezhen porcelain.

Source: Italian

Plural: Kawlini

Kobalt

Cobalt is a chemical element with the symbol Co and atomic number 27. Like nickel, cobalt is found in the Earth’s crust only in chemically combined form, save for small deposits found in alloys of natural meteoric iron. The free element, produced by reductive smelting, is a hard, lustrous, silver-gray metal.

Ref: JA

Krijolit

Cryolite (Na3AlF6, sodium hexafluoroaluminate): an uncommon mineral identified with the once large deposit at Ivigtût on the west coast of Greenland, depleted by 1987.

Source: Italian

Plural: Krijoliti

Krisoberill

Chrysoberyl: The mineral or gemstone chrysoberyl is an aluminate of beryllium with the formula BeAl2O4.The name chrysoberyl is derived from the Greek words χρυσός chrysos and βήρυλλος beryllos, meaning “a gold-white spar”. Despite the similarity of their names, chrysoberyl and beryl are two completely different gemstones, although they both contain beryllium. Chrysoberyl is the third-hardest frequently encountered natural gemstone and lies at 8.5 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness, between corundum (9) and topaz (8).

Plural: krisoberilli

Krisoprasi

Chrysoprase, chrysophrase or chrysoprasus is a gemstone variety of chalcedony (a cryptocrystalline form of silica) that contains small quantities of nickel. Its color is normally apple-green, but varies to deep green. The darker varieties of chrysoprase are also referred to as prase. (However, the term prase is also used to describe chlorite-included quartz, and to a certain extent is a color-descriptor, rather than a rigorously defined mineral variety.)

Kromite

Chromite: a mineral that is an iron chromium oxide. It has a chemical formula of FeCr2O4. It is an oxide mineral belonging to the spinel group.

Kupru

copper sulphate:  the inorganic compounds with the chemical formula CuSO4(H2O)x, where x can range from 0 to 5. The pentahydrate (x = 5) is the most common form. Older names for this compound include blue vitriol, bluestone, vitriol of copper, and Roman vitriol.

 

Kurindun

or kurundun: Corundum: a crystalline form of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) typically containing traces of iron, titanium, vanadium and chromium. It is a rock-forming mineral. It is also a naturally transparent material, but can have different colors depending on the presence of transition metal impurities in its crystalline structure.

Plural: kurinduni